FEMA Emergency Supply Kit

FEMA Guides and Manuals

Direct Reference FEMA Publication:

Additional Items to Consider Adding to an Emergency Supply Kit:

  1. Prescription medications and glasses
  2. Infant formula and diapers
  3. Pet food and extra water for your pet
  4. Important family documents such as copies of insurance policies, identification and bank account records in a waterproof, portable container
  5. Cash or traveler’s checks and change
  6. Emergency reference material such as a first aid book or information. Ditch Medicine – Advanced Field Procedures for Emergencies
  7. Sleeping bag or warm blanket for each person. Consider additional bedding if you live in a cold-weather climate.
  8. Complete change of clothing including a long sleeved shirt, long pants and sturdy shoes. Consider additional clothing if you live in a cold-weather climate.
  9. Household chlorine bleach and medicine dropper – When diluted nine parts water to one part bleach, bleach can be used as a disinfectant. Or in an emergency, you can use it to treat water by using 16 drops of regular household liquid bleach per gallon of water. Do not use scented, color safe or bleaches with added cleaners.
  10. Fire Extinguisher
  11. Matches in a waterproof container
  12. Feminine supplies and personal hygiene items
  13. Mess kits, paper cups, plates and plastic utensils, paper towels q Paper and pencil
  14. Books, games, puzzles or other activities for children

Recommended Items to Include in a Basic Emergency Supply Kit:

  1. Water, one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  2. Federal Emergency Management Agency
  3. Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
    Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
  4. Flashlight and extra batteries
  5. First aid kit USMC IFAK First Aid Kit
  6. Whistle to signal for help
  7. Dust mask, to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
  8. Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  9. Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  10. Can opener for food (if kit contains canned food)
  11. Local maps

Through its Ready Campaign, the Federal Emergency Management Agency educates and empowers Americans to take some simple steps to prepare for and respond to potential emergencies, including natural disasters and terrorist attacks. Ready asks individuals to do three key things: get an emergency supply kit, make a family emergency plan, and be informed about the different types of emergencies that could occur and their appropriate responses.

All Americans should have some basic supplies on hand in order to survive for at least three days if an emergency occurs. Following is a listing of some basic items that every emergency supply kit should include. However, it is important that individuals review this list and consider where they live and the unique needs of their family in order to create an emergency supply kit that will meet these needs. Individuals should also consider having at least two emergency supply kits, one full kit at home and smaller portable kits in their workplace, vehicle or other places they spend time.

Note: Firearms or protective items are not listed anywhere in this document, but this is also what could be considered ‘Introduction Into Prepping for Beginners’.
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About 2LT Website Administrator

Retired health resources analyst and county level emergency manager with specialized training in NIMS/BICS/IICS/Executive ICS/Multi-agency Coordination. Still relatively young I left the service of the federal government due to increasing concerns.

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